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Archive for the ‘Search Engine Marketing’ Category

By now, there are uncontacted tribes in the Amazon that have not only heard of Pokémon GO but that are already out running around in their free time chasing Charmanders and Jigglypuffs. The game has firmly transitioned over from a trend into an all-out craze, and if you haven’t found yourself engulfed in a mob of […]

Back in February, we wrote about Google’s removal of right-side ads from search results and the effect it could have on the search engine marketing landscape as a whole. Well today, the next phase of Google’s search advertising changes has gone live in the form of expanded text ads. These expanded text ads (pictured below) feature double headlines […]

You’ve organized your campaign, carefully crafted your ad, and made sure your ad ranks well when people search for your service or product. Soon your ad is appearing when customers search. They read your ad and then decide, yes, this warrants a click.

Your ad has done its job and now it’s up to your landing page to deliver.

So, what’s the magic recipe for a good landing page? To better help you understand what makes a customer explore your landing page and what sends them running for the “Back” button, we’ve devised two helpful acronyms: STAY and FLEE.

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Google Analytics is a great service. It provides a ton of information about your Website visitors, and, best of all, it’s free. However, it provides SO much information, that for people who don’t use it everyday, it can be difficult to sort out what is important and what isn’t within the Google Analytics reports. We’re […]

It’s official – Microsoft and Yahoo announced today they’ve received regulatory clearance from the U.S. and European Union to combine their search engine efforts. What does this mean? It means by the 2010 holiday season (or by early 2011, MS and Yahoo are giving themselves some wiggle room on the actual date), when consumers do […]

Clients often ask us, “Shouldn’t we just focus all our efforts on SEO, because once we get high organic listings then we don’t have to pay the search engines for those clicks?” Well, if it was as simple as that, then Google would not be a $196 billion company. It is true, the optimal situation […]

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